Tree Trimmer Job Description

Tree trimmers (also called arborists) cut dead and excess branches from shrubs and trees to improve appearance, maintain usability, or improve the health of the plant.

The responsibilities for tree trimmers vary by position. Some trim and shape ornamental trees. Others maintain parks or other public facilities, and some work with construction crews to clear limbs near utility lines.

Additional responsibilities for tree trimmers include:

  • Trimming and reshaping trees.
  • Operating chipping and shredding equipment.
  • Operating stump chippers, tractors, trucks, boom trucks, and other equipment.

Work Environment and Schedule

Tree trimmers spend most of their time working outside and traveling from job to job. Because

Demand for tree trimmers is very seasonal. Work may be scarce in the fall in winter months, while overtime is often required in the spring and summer.

Because they work with chainsaws and other equipment, this can be a dangerous occupation if the proper safety precautions aren’t taken.

How to Become a Tree Trimmer

Tree trimmers are trained on the job. Training for this position includes instruction in the use of stump grinders, chainsaws, wood chippers, and other equipment.

Certification is not required for employment in this occupation, but can be attained from the Tree Care Industry Association.

Employment Outlook

There are currently 44,980 tree trimmers in the United States, with 1,720 new tree trimmer job openings created each year.

Tree Trimmer jobs are not expected to see much growth beyond their current levels in the next decade.

Tree Trimmer Salaries

Overall Salaries

Tree Trimmer salaries can vary depending on your experience, the location, company, industry, and benefits provided. Nationwide, most tree trimmers make between $24,100 – $38,300 per year, or $11.60 – $18.42 per hour.

Updated: 09/02/2017

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